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I usually do not (pretty much never) do anovas or use R factors, but this seems pretty disturbing.

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says:
March 17, 2018 at 10:01 pm

I guess you are supposed to do this instead of “summary”, then they are the same?

> anova(fit1) Analysis of Variance Table

Response: Val Df Sum Sq Mean Sq F value Pr(>F) Group 1 4.5071 4.5071 2.5798 0.1835 Sex 1 0.2409 0.2409 0.1379 0.7292 Group:Sex 1 0.0657 0.0657 0.0376 0.8557 Residuals 4 6.9881 1.7470 > anova(fit2) Analysis of Variance Table

Response: Val Df Sum Sq Mean Sq F value Pr(>F) Group 1 4.5071 4.5071 2.5798 0.1835 Sex 1 0.2409 0.2409 0.1379 0.7292 Group:Sex 1 0.0657 0.0657 0.0376 0.8557 Residuals 4 6.9881 1.7470

Perhaps related (And someone cites Gelman 2005 there): https://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/175246/why-is-anova-equivalent-to-linear-regression

Its probably another one of those things that is “obvious” to people with good training in stats but severely disturbing to most people trying to apply it.

Reply to this comment
says:
March 17, 2018 at 10:19 am

In chap 13 of your book with Jennifer Hill you note that using a hierarchical Bayesian framework estimates can be derived in the posterior even when n=1 for a label or feature. Why wouldn’t this also be true for interactions?

Reply to this comment
says:
March 19, 2018 at 4:41 am

“I don’t know if all this in the textbooks, but it should be.”

Maxwell and Delaney have it covered (“Designing Experiments and Analyzing Data: A Model Comparison Perspective”, 2nd Ed., p. 318). They refer to an Abelson insight: The ratio of the t-values for the main effect and the interaction effect is equal to (t1+t2)/(t1-t2), where t1 and t2 refer to the simple main effects. Assuming t1 and t2 to be on the same side (i.e., ordinal interaction), the effect size of the interaction will always be smaller than the main effect unless one of the simple main effects is zero. Playing around with the equation by assuming that one simple main effect is half the size of the other (t2=.5*t1) yields the solution that the effect size of the main effect must be three times that of the interaction. In many cases where disordinal interactions are implausible, t2=.5*t1 may be a reasonable assumption. In this scenario, the power for the interaction would be ~5 times lower than the power for the main effect: pnorm(2.8, 1.96, 1) / pnorm(2.8/3, 1.96, 1).

Reply to this comment
says:
March 20, 2018 at 12:14 pm

Some nice mathematical work on the issue of constraints on size of the interaction is available in

Older .doc files

For older .doc files, you can save the document as HTML with Microsoft Word and then convert the resulting HTML file with calibre. When saving as HTML, be sure to use the “Save as Web Page, Filtered” option as this will produce clean HTML that will convert well. Note that Word produces really messy HTML, converting it can take a long time, so be patient. If you have a newer version of Word available, you can directly save it as docx as well.

Another alternative is to use the free OpenOffice. Open your .doc file in OpenOffice and save it in OpenOffice’s format .odt. calibre can directly convert .odt files.

TXT documents have no well defined way to specify formatting like bold, italics, etc, or document structure like paragraphs, headings, sections and so on, but there are a variety of conventions commonly used. By default calibre attempts automatic detection of the correct formatting and markup based on those conventions.

TXT input supports a number of options to differentiate how paragraphs are detected.

Assumes one or more blank lines are a paragraph boundary:

Assumes that every line is a paragraph:

Assumes that every paragraph starts with an indent (either a tab or 2+ spaces). Paragraphs end when the next line that starts with an indent is reached:

PDF documents are one of the worst formats to convert from. They are a fixed page size and text placement format. Meaning, it is very difficult to determine where one paragraph ends and another begins. calibre will try to unwrap paragraphs using a configurable, Line Un-Wrapping Factor . This is a scale used to determine the length at which a line should be unwrapped. Valid values are a decimal between 0 and 1. The default is 0.45, just under the median line length. Lower this value to include more text in the unwrapping. Increase to include less. You can adjust this value in the conversion settings under PDF Input .

Also, they often have headers and footers as part of the document that will become included with the text. Use the Search and Replace panel to remove headers and footers to mitigate this issue. If the headers and footers are not removed from the text it can throw off the paragraph unwrapping. To learn how to use the header and footer removal options, read All about using regular expressions in calibre .

Some limitations of PDF input are:

To re-iterate PDF is a really, really bad format to use as input. If you absolutely must use PDF, then be prepared for an output ranging anywhere from decent to unusable, depending on the input PDF.

PDF is a really, really bad

A comic book collection is a .cbc file. A .cbc file is a ZIP file that contains other CBZ/CBR files. In addition the .cbc file must contain a simple text file called comics.txt, encoded in UTF-8. The comics.txt file must contain a list of the comics files inside the .cbc file, in the form filename:title, as shown below:

A-Frame provides components for controllers across the spectrum as supported by their respective WebVR browsers through the Gamepad Web API . There are components for Vive, Oculus Touch, Daydream, and GearVR controllers.

To inspect the Gamepad object for poking around or to get the Gamepad ID, we can call navigator.getGamepads() in the browser console. This will return a GamepadList array with all of the connected controllers.

For advanced applications, controllers are built and tailored for the application (i.e., custom 3D models, animations, mappings, gestures). For example, a medieval knight might have metal gauntlets, or a robot might have a robot hand that can shoot lasers or display information on the wrist.

The controller components that A-Frame provide primarily act as defaults, starter components, or a base from which to derive more custom controller components.

The tracked-controls component is A-Frame’s base controller component that provides the foundation for all of A-Frame’s controller components. The tracked-controls component:

All of A-Frame’s controller components build on top of the tracked-controls component by:

The controller components following are only activated if they detect the controller is found and seen as connected in the Gamepad API.

Controllers with 3 degrees of freedom (3DoF) are limited to rotational tracking. 3DoF controllers have no positional tracking meaning we can’t reach out nor move our hand back-and-forth or up-and-down. Having a controller with only 3DoF is like having a hand and wrist without an arm. Read more about degrees of freedom for VR .

The 3DoF controller components provide rotational tracking, a default model matching the real-life hardware, and events to abstract the button mappings. The controllers for Google Daydream and Samsung GearVR have 3DoF, and both support only one controller for one hand.

To add a controller for Google Daydream, use the daydream-controls component . Then try it out on Chrome for Android on a Daydream smartphone:

To add a controller for Samsung GearVR, use the gearvr-controls component . Then try it out on Oculus Carmel or Samsung Internet on a smartphone with GearVR:

Controllers with 6 degrees of freedom (6DoF) have both rotational and positional tracking. Unlike controllers with 3DoF which are constrained to orientation, controllers with 6DoF are able to move freely in 3D space. 6DoF allows us to reach forward, behind our backs, move our hands across our body or close to our face. Having 6DoF is like reality where we have both hands and arms. 6DoF also applies to the headset and additional trackers (e.g., feet, props). Having 6DoF is a minimum for providing a truly immersive VR experience.

Remote Desktop Services Features User Interfaces and Infrastructure Desktop Experience Role Services Remote Desktop Session Host Instant Clone.

The FlexEngine ADMX template is available under User Configuration\ Administrative Templates\VMware UEM\FlexEngine .

User Configuration\ Administrative Templates\VMware UEM\FlexEngine Flex config Files Profile archives Run FlexEngine as a Group Policy Extension A logoff script

"C:\Program Files\Immidio\Flex Profiles\FlexEngine.exe" -s

Appendix C: NSX Manager Installation and Configuration

This appendix provides an overview of the NSX deployment proces s and includes an extensive list of the firewall rules used in this reference architecture .

NSX Installation

This section outlines the NSX installation steps. This guide is not intended to replace the Womens Scarlet Damen Slip Rio Thong CALIDA Sneakernews Sale Online Visit New For Sale Cheap Real Finishline Cheap Browse Shop iFQIxUY
.

Before starting, the NSX Manager requires other infrastructure components to be in place and configured:

Please follow the relevant section of the NSX Installation Guide to install all of the following components.

Post-Installation Configuration

Perform the following tasks for each NSX Manager.

Certificates

When you first install NSX, self-signed certificates are used. It is not recommended that you use these in production. At a high level, the steps for replacing the certificates on the NSX Managers are:

For the full process, see NSX Manager SSL Certification in the NSX Documentation .

NSX Distributed Firewall Rules for Horizon 7

The NSX firewall rules implemented in this reference architecture can be grouped into the following categories:

The configuration uses the isolation and segmentation features of NSX to protect the Horizon 7 environment.

Note : The tables in this appendix occasionally use the following abbreviations:

Resource Block of VDI and RDSH Machines and Infrastructure

The following tables list the rules that apply to the resource block, where the virtual desktops reside. These rules block desktop-to-desktop communication and allow only the necessary communications to the corresponding infrastructure services within the management block.

Note : In the tables, means .

Table 109 : Connectivity Rule Set for Internal Connections

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 110 : Internal Connections Services

Table 111 : Desktops Rule Set for VDI and RDSH

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 112 : VDI and RDSH Services

Management Block for Horizon 7 Infrastructure Components

The following tables list the rules that apply to the resource block where the Horizon 7 infrastructure and related services reside. These rules allow only the necessary communications among the various infrastructure services and to the virtual desktops within the resource block.

Table 113 : Connectivity Rule Set for External Connections

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 114 : External Connections Services

Table 115 : Connectivity Rule Set for Internal Connections

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 116 : Internal Connections Services

Table 117 : Desktops Rule Set for VDI and RDSH

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 118 : VDI and RDSH Services

Connection Servers

Table 119 : Infrastructure Rule Set for Connection Servers

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 120 : Connection Server Services

Unified Access Gateway

Table 121 : Infrastructure Rule Set for Unified Access Gateway

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 122 : Unified Access Gateway Services

VMware Identity Manager

Table 123 : Infrastructure Rule Set for VMware Identity Manager

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 124 : Identity Manager Services

App Volumes Manager

Table 125 : Infrastructure Rule Set for App Volumes Manager

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 126 : App Volumes Manager Services

vRealize Operations for Horizon

Table 127 : Infrastructure Rule Set for vRealize Operations for Horizon

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 128 : vRealize Operations for Horizon Services

Management

Table 129 : Infrastructure Rule Set for Management

The following table lists the services that are affected by the rules listed in the preceding table.

Table 130 : Management Services

Connectivity Rule for Block All

Table 131 : Connectivity Rule for Block All

Appendix D: Horizon 7 Recovery Services Test Plan

This section includes test plans for the two main recovery services described in this reference architecture:

Active/Passive Horizon 7 Service Failover Test/Recovery Plan

In the following test, a persistent desktop user , with a home site of Site 1, a User Environment Manager profile, and assigned AppStacks and a writable volume, fails over from Site 1 to Site 2 after a DR event.

Figure 138 : Active/Passive Horizon 7 Service Failover Test/Recovery Plan

The following table lists the preliminary tests and checks to be performed.

Table 132 : Active/Passive Preliminary Tests

The following list of tests includes descriptions of occurrences during an active/passive service failover, the recovery steps required, and the test results.

Table 133 : Active/Passive Test Results

Active/Active Horizon 7 Service Failover Test/Recovery Plan

In the test plan depicted in the figure below, a floating desktop user with a User Environment Manager profile and an assigned AppStack fails over from Site 1 to Site 2 after a disaster event.

Figure 139 : Active/Active Horizon 7 Service Failover Test/Recovery Plan

The following table lists the preliminary tests and checks to be performed.

Table 134 : Active/Active Preliminary Tests

The following list of tests includes descriptions of occurrences during an active/active service failover, the recovery steps required, and the test results.

Table 135 : Active/Active Test Results

Notes

Appendix E: App Volumes Configuration for Multi-site Deployments

This appendix provides detailed instructions for deploying App Volumes across multiple sites, implementing redundancy both within and across sites.

As is described in the section of the Component Design: App Volumes Architecture chapter, there are two deployment options for the App Volumes database across multiple sites: using separate databases or using a clustered database. This appendix provides detailed procedures for implementing either option. This appendix includes the following sections:

Configuration Procedures for a Clustered App Volumes Database Across Multiple Sites

This configuration usesa clustered SQL database that is common across Site 1 and Site 2. Database failover is needed if the primary instance fails, as described in Perform a Forced Manual Failover of an Availability Group (SQL Server) .

To create a clustered highly available App Volumes database, perform the procedures in the following order:

Create a Windows Server Failover Cluster and Configure Shared Storage

A Windows Server Failover Clustering (WSFC) failover cluster is a group of VMs that have the same software installed on them and work together as one instance to provide high availability for a service, such as a Microsoft SQL Server database. If a VM, or cluster node, in the cluster fails, another node in the cluster begins to provide the service.

To create a WSFC cluster with shared storage:

Install the SQL Server Failover Cluster

In this procedure, you run the Setup.exe program from the SQL Server installation media to install a new failover cluster on the first SQL Server VM. On the second SQL Server VM, you run the Setup.exe program and select to add a node to the existing SQL Server failover cluster that you created on the first SQL Server VM.

To create SQL Server failover cluster instances for both sites:

Now we have a WSFC cluster with two SQL Server failover instances, and a total of four SQL servers.

Configure Cluster Quorum Settings and Possible Owners for Each Cluster Instance

At this point, you will configure cluster quorum settings and specify which cluster nodes (VMs) each cluster instance can run on. Each element in a cluster can cast one “vote” to determine whether the cluster can run. Because you have two nodes in a cluster and you need an odd number of voting elements, create a file share quorum witness, which will cast the third vote. A file share witness is recommended when you need to consider multi-site disaster recovery with replicated storage.

To configure the cluster quorum settings:

We are now ready to create the database and configure an Always On availability group for the VMware App Volumes database.

Create the App Volumes Clustered Database Using Backup and Restore

In this procedure, you create the database in Site 1, make a backup, and then create the database in Site 2 by restoring from the backup you created in Site 1.

Note : This procedure is the fourth task in the configuration procedures listed at the beginning of this appendix. Be sure you complete the tasks for creating a WSFC cluster, SQL Server failover cluster instance (FCI), and cluster quorum before completing creating the database using the following procedure.

To create the databases in both sites:

Create and Configure the SQL Server Always On Availability Group for VMware App Volumes

In this procedure, you create an Always On availability group, add the SQL Server clustered instance from Site 1 as the primary replica and the instance from Site 2 as the secondary replica. You then configure some advanced parameters for the availability group listener.

To create the availability group:

Now that the database is set up and the SQL Server Always On availability groups are configured, you can deploy and configure App Volumes Manager to point to the Always On availability group for the database.

Install and Configure App Volumes Manager

If you have completed the preceding procedures in this appendix, you now have an availability group listener to point to when you install the App Volumes Managers in each site. Perform the following tasks in the specified order:

You can use a global namespace for the App Volumes Manager service between sites, but this is not a requirement. This model adds some complexity because the load balancer is responsible for making sure that desktops in Site 1 are connected to the App Volumes Manager in Site 1 and desktops in Site 2 are connected to the App Volumes Manager in Site 2. The benefit in doing this is in not having to maintain two different configurations in the desktop master image in terms of which FQDN the App Volumes Agent is pointing to. Keep in mind that using separate namespaces is equally valid.

Configuration Procedures for Separate App Volumes for Database Instances in Multiple Sites

This design uses separate App Volumes database instances for each site, rather than using a clustered database across sites. With this option, you still use Always On availability groups, but each site has its own availability group to achieve automatic failover within a site. To make user-based entitlements for AppStacks available between sites, you must use a PowerShell script, which VMware provides. This setup is shown in the following figure.

To use this setup, perform the procedures in the following order:

Create a Windows Server Failover Cluster in Each Site

A failover cluster is a group of VMs that have the same software installed on them and work together as one instance to provide high availability for a service, such as a Microsoft SQL Server database. If a VM, or cluster node, in the cluster fails, another node in the cluster begins to provide the service.

Note : For information about setting up F5 load balancers for use with App Volumes, see F5 with App Volumes Configuration Guide . If you are using another type of load balancer, verify that you have set up this load balancer according to the vendor’s instructions.

To create a Windows Server Failover Clustering (WSFC) cluster:

Install SQL Server 2016 Stand-Alone in All VMs

You install SQL Server Stand-Alone on each VM, rather than creating a SQL Server failover cluster. For App Volumes, you use stand-alone installations and then create Always On availability groups to achieve failover within a site.

To install SQL Server:

Create the App Volumes Databases and Enable Availability Groups for the Clusters

This document provides detailed instructions for creating a highly available database but does not give recommendations regarding the sizing of the database for various sizes of deployments. For information about database sizing, see Free Shipping For Cheap Outlet 100% Guaranteed Essential Top MASKS by VIDA VIDA Buy Cheap Newest p3oKoK
.

To create the databases:

Create Always On Availability Groups for App Volumes Databases

In this procedure, you create an Always On availability group, adding the SQL Server stand-alone instances from Site 1 as the primary replica and secondary replicas. You then do the same for Site 2, so that each site has its own Always On availability group to achieve automatic failover within each site (but not across sites).

To create the availability groups:

Configure Cluster Quorum Settings

At this point, you will configure cluster quorum settings to use a file share witness. Each element in a cluster can cast one “vote” to determine whether the cluster can run. Because you have two nodes in a cluster and you need an odd number of voting elements, create a file share quorum witness, which will caste the third vote. A file share witness is recommended when you need to consider multi-site disaster recovery with replicated storage.

To configure cluster quorum settings:

You are now ready to install App Volumes and point to the availability group we created.

Install App Volumes to Use a Highly Available Database

This procedure focuses on the specific settings required for connecting App Volumes to a highly available database. For details about other aspects of App Volumes installation, including system requirements, see the
.

To install App Volumes:

With App Volumes successfully installed, you can begin configuration. For detailed instructions see the VMware App Volumes User Guide . Also see the Womens Quilted Fixed Tri Bikini Top Seafolly Buy Cheap Huge Surprise FVinz
.

The procedures in this appendix create a setup in which the App Volumes database can failover automatically within each site. Site 1 and Site 2 have separate databases, but during a failover, users for Site 1 will be able to use replicated App Volumes AppStacks in Site 2 as long as the user entitlements are also replicated. For configuration details, see the next section, PowerShell Script for Replicating App Volumes Application Entitlements .

PowerShell Script for Replicating App Volumes Application Entitlements

To use this script, you copy and paste thescript, either to the database VM, to run the script locally on the server, or to another location, where you can run the script remotely as long as you have an account with the proper permissions and the machine meets the following software requirements:

Next, open the script with a text editor and change the username, password, source server, and destination server to match your environment. These items are shown in bold text, in the first five lines of the following script. When you are finished, save the file with a .ps1 extension.

$Credentials = @{

username = ' domain \ username '

password = ' password '

}

$SourceServer = " SourceServerFQDN "

$TargetServer = " DestinationServerFQDN "

Invoke-RestMethod -SessionVariable SourceServerSession -Method Post -Uri "https://$SourceServer/cv_api/sessions" -Body $Credentials

Invoke-RestMethod -SessionVariable TargetServerSession -Method Post -Uri "https://$TargetServer/cv_api/sessions" -Body $Credentials

$SourceAssignments = (Invoke-RestMethod -WebSession $SourceServerSession -Method Get -Uri "https://$SourceServer/cv_api/assignments").assignments

$SourceAppstacks = Invoke-RestMethod -WebSession $SourceServerSession -Method Get -Uri "https://$SourceServer/cv_api/appstacks"

$TargetAppStacks = Invoke-RestMethod -WebSession $TargetServerSession -Method Get -Uri "https://$TargetServer/cv_api/appstacks"

foreach ($Assignment in $SourceAssignments)

{

$SourceAppStack = $SourceAppStacks.Where({$_.id -eq $assignment.snapvol_id})[0]

$TargetAppStack = $TargetAppStacks.Where({$_.name -eq $SourceAppstack.name})[0]

Invoke-RestMethod -WebSession $TargetServerSession -Method Post -Uri "https://$TargetServer/cv_api/assignments?action_type=assignid=$($TargetAppStack.id)assignments%5B0%5D%5Bentity_type%5D=$($assignment.entityt)assignments%5B0%5D%5Bpath%5D=$($assignment.entity_dn)"

}

Next Steps: Installing and Setting Up Other App Volumes Components

After installation is complete, you must perform the following tasks to start using App Volumes:

Using a cluster of VMs across physical hosts protects against software failures and hardware failures on the physical machine by placing the cluster nodes on separate VMware ESXi hosts. This configuration requires shared storage on a Fibre Channel SAN for the quorum disk. The VMs share a private network connection, for the private heartbeat, and a public network connection.

Nathaniel Percy

Nathan covers crime and public safety for the Daily Breeze. Prior to joining the coverage team in the South Bay, Nathan worked for the Orange County Register, where he covered south Orange County cities and community sports.A freelance play-by-play broadcaster, Nathan can be heard calling high school baseball and community college football games during the spring on his days off.
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